Drills to improve
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    Spin - Ups

    Find a moderate sized climb with a gradual descent. Once you’re at the top, shift into a gear that puts you around 70 rwp On the way down, don’t shift gears, gradually letting your cadence rise until you get to the bottom. Shoot to be well above 100 maw by the time you reach the bottom. Repeat 4 to 5 times.

    Suggestion

    When you get more comfortable with this drill, start at a higher cadence at the top of the descent. As with the other drills, make sure you are applying even pressure for the full rotation of the pedal stroke, avoiding dead spots where power isn’t being produced.

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    Single leg Pedaling on the Trailer

    If you have an indoor cycling trainer, this is a great drill to improve pedalling efficiency. With one foot clipped into your pedal and the other leg free (either resting on the frame of your trainer or on a box next to the bike), shift to an easy gear and pedal for20 to 30 seconds (or until fatigue), then repeat with the opposite leg. Start with five repetitions with each leg, increasing the duration of the drill as it becomes easier.

    Suggestion

    This drill will feel awkward at first, in part because you will likely have many spots along the course of one revolution where power isn’t being produced. These are called dead spots, and are precisely the reason why this drill helps you to pedal in smooth circles. If you’re having a hard time with this drill at first, clip both feet into the pedals. Do the drill the same, trying not to use one leg (even though clipped in) and letting the other leg do all the work. Switch legs every five pedal strokes forabout five minutes. This is also a good way to practice if you don’t have an indoor trainer or forwhen you’re riding on the road.

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    Cadence Intervals

    From your normal cadence and shift to an easier gear 2 to 3 above what you would normally ride at. Ride for five minutes at this new cadence (which should be between 90 and 120 tw) and retum to your normal cadence. Try this several times during your ride during long flat sections.

    Suggestion

    If you’re using a speedometer or power meter try to maintain your speed or power when you shift to the higher cadence. This is a good way to improve your cardio and give your muscles and joints a break from the big gears. Remember to try and keep a smooth pedalling rhythm even as you start to fatigue. If your hips start to bounce because your pedalling more quickly than you can keep up with, go to a slightly harder gear that you can more easily maintain. Whether you’re looking to improve your efficiency for a cycling on the road or the dirt, these drills will help you become a better, more efficient cyclist no matter what your preferred cadence is.

How to Train for a Long Bike Ride
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    Step1

    Include interval training two to three times per week as you prepare for a Long ride to increase your endurance and build your aerobic capacity. While you need to take Long training rides, frequent interval training should be interspersed in your schedule. Ride hard for three minutes and then rest for three minutes. Continue with this pattern for 30 to 60 minutes.

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    Step 2

    Train until you reach your lactate threshold at Least twice per week. The lactate threshold indicates your anaerobic capacity. Typically cyclists reach their Lactate threshold at close to 85 to 95 percent of their maximum heart rate. Use a power meter to track your performance. Hit the threshold and maintain the strokes for 10 minutes and then rest for two minutes. At least once a week ride at your maximum anaerobic capability for a solid 20 to 30 minutes.

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    Step 3

    Perform resistance strength building exercises every other day to build muscle endurance Concentrate on your Leg muscles by doing squats and Lunges while holding onto free weights. Do 50 repetitions of each. Use leg machines at the gym set to weights comparable to the amount of resistance you use while pedaling to best replicate your Long-distance ride.

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    Step 4

    Stretch after every training session to increase your flexibility and avoid stiffness. Stretch your glutes. Hamstrings and legs by sitting on the floor and bending your Legs to pull each muscle group. Hold each stretch for 20 to 30 seconds to get the maximum benefit. Stand and pull each leg behind you and hold. lean against a wail with your legs behind you and stretch the backs of your legs.

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    Step 5

    Continue training in the winter months if you Live in a colder climate by cross country skiing and riding indoor on a stationary bike.

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    Warnings

    According to Ultra Cycling trainers, you should listen closely to your body when you are in training for a Long ride to avoid injury and to determine which areas need the most work. For example if you can only maintain your lactate threshold for 15 minutes. then make a note to prepare your ride accordingly. If you get a cramp. stop and rest to ease the discomfort. Pushing beyond your body’s capacities can result in serious injuries that.

Ways to completely transform your entire Cycling Life
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To avoid muscles soreness and fatiigu, dont hunch your shoulders. Tilt your head every few minutes to stave off tight neck muscles. Better yet: Stop to admire the scenery.
By sliding rearward or forward on the sadle, you can emphasize different muscle groups. This is useful on a Iong climb as a way to give various muscles a rest while others take over the work. Moving forward accentuates the quadriceps, while moving back emphasizes the hamstrings and glutes.
If you’re not comfortable taking both hands off the bar, after pulling an arm warmer down with the opposite hand, use your teeth to pull the bundled fabric the rest of the way over your wrist and off.
Don’t move your upper body too much. Let your back serve as a fulcrum, with your bike swaying from side to side beneath It.
Keep your shoulders behind the front wheel axle. Too much weight forward makes the bike hard to handle and could cause the rear wheel to skip up into the air
Pull on the bar with a rowing motion to counter the power of your legs. This helps transfer your energy to the pedals rather than into wasted movement.
If you don’t have a chance to slow for an obstacle such as railroad tracks or a pothole, quickly pull upward on the handlebar to lift your front wheel. You may still damage the rear wheel, or it might suffer a pinch flat, but you’ll prevent an impact on the front that could cause a crash.
Beware of creeping forward on the saddle and hunching your back when you’re tired. Shift to a higher gear and stand to pedal periodically to prevent stiffness in your hips and back.
Relax your grip. On smooth, traffic-tree pavement, practice draping your hands over the handlebar. This not only will he alleviate muscle tension, but also will reduce the amount of road vibration transmitted to your body.
Periodically change hand position. Grasp the drops for descents or high- speed riding and the brake-lever hoods for relaxed cruising. On long climbs, hold the top of the bar to sit upright and open your chest for easier breathing. When standing, grasp the hoods lightly and gently rock the bike from side to side in sync with your pedal strokes. But always keep each thumb and a finger closed around the hood or bar to prevent yourself from losing control if you hit an unexpected bump.
Handlebar width should equal shoulder width. A wider bar opens your chest for breathing, a narrower one is generally more aerodynamic. Pick the one that fy,Qr your riding style. Position the angle of the bar so the bottom, flat portion is parallel to the ground, or else points Just slightly down, toward the rear hub.
If you’re leading a paceline up a hill, keep your cadence and pedal pressure constant by shifting to a lower gear.
As your effort becomes harder, Increase the force of your breaths rather than the frequency.
When riding in a group, always keep your hands in contact with your brakes, either in the drops or on the hoods. That way, you are always prepared to slow.
Keep your arms in line with your body, not splayed elbows out. This is an easy way to make yourself more aerodynarnicand go faster with no extra energy.

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